Netflix wins for Kiwi and here comes Taika: the week that was in pop culture

Welcome to Pop Tart, our weekly roundup of what’s hot in the world of pop culture, from movies to memes, from books to new looks.

Here’s what caught our attention this week:

Musician, composer and rapper David Dallas has been a fixture of the local hip hop scene for so long, it’s almost a surprise to find that he’s still a “world famous New Zealand” figure who didn’t have the impact he had. deserves offshore.

Dallas ‘signature hit Runnin’ has appeared in video games, most notably FIFA 14, but most of all the world has been woefully kept in the dark about one of our best ever.

That all changed last week, with the release of Adam Sandler’s Hustle, which uses Runnin ‘prominently and practically in full, to mark the all-important “training montage” without which no sports film is complete.

Runnin ‘uses a sample from Philadelphia producer and DJ King Britt, from the song New World In My View, so we can perhaps imagine it was the connection with Philadelphia – Hustle is set in that beautiful city – that sealed the deal and made got runnin ‘over the line. Either way, with a track in – as of this writing – the number one movie on Netflix, and critics adore it too, Dallas is finally garnering some of the international accolades it has long been due.

The sound of Aotearoa’s hip hop is unique. He draws on American West and East Coast styles, but is also heavily influenced by Pasifika music, with a large dose of our country’s obsession with reggae mixed into the mix as well.

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Listening to that unmistakable style roll over the scenes of Philadelphia’s snowy streets was a surprise, yet somehow perfect.

Aldous, Reb – and Albanese

Jacinda Ardern and Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese smile and take a selfie during Ardern's visit last week.

Office of the Australian Prime Minister

Jacinda Ardern and Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese smile and take a selfie during Ardern’s visit last week.

It’s a well-known saying – that I just made it up, that you should always vote for someone who has a decent taste in music. While our last PM – of whatever longevity – apparently loved Hayley Westenra a little (or, so he said. His delivery made it sound like a name a PR hack had suggested to him), our current PM famously has a DJ ‘d in night clubs and at parties for years.

Having seen her on the decks at least once, I can also say that she knows exactly what she is doing up there and where the bangers are in her collection.

So when it came time to cross the moat to say good morning to the new guy – and even knowing Albanese has his own history as a DJ, Ardern knew what it would take to break the ice. Step up, four classic cymbals from the good people of Flying Nun records.

There was Warm Chris, Aldous Harding’s new album, of which respected musical spider Pitchfork said: “His soft, slightly psychedelic folk pop is deceptively thorny and thick,” which plays right in the wheelhouse of Pop Tart.

Plus IRIS, the late 2021 version of Reb Fountain, which, if you’re not already a Reb fan, is a good place to start. Also, aren’t you already a Reb fan? Seriously, recover.

Also included – and this is where the list really betrays the credibility of the breeder – was the absolutely crucial and genre-defining EP of the 1981 Clean Boodle Boodle Boodle, which is one of the cornerstones of “Dunedin Sound” and also , 40 years later, a timeless slice of New Zealand’s pop and post-punk songwriting magic.

And finally, just to joke and laugh, the vinyl reissue of Auckland’s seminal punk compilation AK 79 was included. this day onwards.

In return, the Australian PM gave Ardern copies of the Midnight Oil albums, Spiderbait and – no, really – Powderfinger.

All we can say about it is that if the two trans-Tasman PMs are playing parties the same night, our money is on Ardern, not Albo, to pack.

Laundry

The laundry, on Cuba St, Wellington, closed after its owners were unable to secure a new lease.  (archive photo)

Ross Giblin

The laundry, on Cuba St, Wellington, closed after its owners were unable to secure a new lease. (archive photo)

The saddest news in the Wellington scene so far this week is that the legendary late-night juke joint, venue, and bar Laundry has been pushed to close, by the landlord’s usual rapacity.

Laundromat has become the best place in town to hear new music, meet solid people, and simply indulge any obsession, while enjoying a perfect pint or amazing cocktail.

The staff were great and would quickly become friends if you treated them like human beings and kept you sociable and friendly no matter how late the night was.

While the rolling list of DJs was among the best ever, Laundry was also one of the few bars in Wellington that offered a respite and an alternative to the ugliness that has engulfed the Courtenay Place scene over the past decade.

With Mighty Mighty and Laundry both gone, and San Fran operating only as a concert venue, some of the “coolest little capital” milestones have been kicked out. And unless something can be done to curb commercial and household rents in this city, there will soon be nothing to replace them.

RIP laundry. You were the best ever. End of.

Our flag means death is returning

Rhys Darby in a scene from Our Flag Means Death.  The cult series by Taika Waititi which will shoot some of its second series in New Zealand.

Provided

Rhys Darby in a scene from Our Flag Means Death. The cult series by Taika Waititi which will shoot some of its second series in New Zealand.

And finally, Taika Waititi’s already cult Our Flag Means Death (well, technically it was created by American showrunner David Jenkins, but try to tell us) has been renewed for a second series, and Waititi – oh okay, Jenkins – is with plans to take the show to Aotearoa for filming.

Waititi was quoted in the US media as saying, “We will hopefully start filming by October, and will be shooting in New Zealand.

“We shot the last one in Los Angeles. Weird place to try and do something all on the ocean, so we’re going to New Zealand which is surrounded by it. This is one of the things I’m most excited about next year. ”

Well, amen to that.

And the show will be another shot in the arm for a local film and TV industry that is still struggling to increase the pace and capacity it had achieved in 2019 before the old you know what shut it all down.

With the start, pre-production and planning of a movie or TV show typically taking a year or two, the film industry is facing many more very difficult months until the international productions we were hosting are ready to return, or new shows and films take their place.

The sector will recover, but that rebound will be slow and delayed, compared to some of our other foreign exchange earners.

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