Your Government Doesn’t Have The Authority To Define Who You Are – Vitalik Buterin Ethereum Creator Is Doubling The Crypto Alias ​​Culture

  • Buterin’s tweet affirms the pseudonymous culture of cryptocurrencies at a time when the industry’s massive development has forced the industry’s major players to be more open about their true identities.
  • Buterin recently entered the discussion on anonymity, while not officially commenting on the Buzzfeed issue. On Wednesday he voiced his ideas about him on Twitter,
  • You don’t get negative personal consequences by saying things that others don’t like, but you also miss out on a lot of positive personal consequences, she tweeted.

Many people are better known by their online monikers than by their real names in the cryptocurrency industry, which is filled with aliases and anonymous users. It’s great with Vitalik Buterin, the 28-year-old founder of the Ethereum blockchain and a leading voice in the world of cryptocurrencies. Your government cannot define who you really are, he said in a tweet on Friday. If you use a different name in most daily contacts, that’s your real name, he said, adding that people should stop referring to their passport names as their real names.

Investors paid in hundreds of millions

Buterin’s tweet affirms the pseudonymous culture of cryptocurrencies at a time when the industry’s massive development has forced the industry’s major players to be more open about their true identities. Despite the fact that investors have poured hundreds of millions, if not billions, of money into what they have developed, many of the people behind major cryptocurrency ventures are only recognized by their aliases.

This challenge was highlighted in February when Buzzfeed revealed the real names of the founders of the popular NFT Bored Ape Yacht Club collection, Gordon Goner and Gargamel. Wylie Aronow and Greg Solano, two 30-year-old literature graduates who met while growing up in Florida, turned out to be them.

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Some members of the cryptocurrency community reacted angrily to Buzzfeed’s post, claiming it was equivalent to doxxing, a term used to describe someone who divulges someone else’s private information online with malicious intent.

The anonymity of the Internet

Buterin recently entered the discussion on anonymity, while not officially commenting on the Buzzfeed issue. He voiced his ideas about him on Twitter Wednesday, noting that while revealing real names for accountability is sometimes beneficial, there are instances where anonymity is required, such as during voting or serving on juries.

On Wednesday, Buterin noted that the anonymity of the internet allows people to express themselves freely. However, he admitted some drawbacks. You don’t get negative personal consequences by saying things that others don’t like, but you also miss a lot of positive personal consequences, she tweeted.

Buterin has already spoken out publicly against anonymity. In 2017, Buterin responded to Russian writer Leonid Bershidsky on Twitter, citing former Google engineer James Damore as an example of the drawbacks of using your real identity in public. Damore sent out a sexist reminder in 2017 attacking Google’s diversity policy, arguing that women have more neuroticism (more anxiety, less stress tolerance).

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